November 9, 2017
MIT

Today, more than 1.3 billion people are living without regular access to power, including more than 300 million in India and 600 million in sub-Saharan Africa. In these and other developing countries, access to a main power grid, particularly in rural regions, is remote and often unreliable.Increasingly, many rural and some urban communities are turning to microgrids as an alternative source of electricity. Microgrids are small-scale power systems that supply local energy, typically in the form of solar power, to localized consumers, such as individual households or small villages.  

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November 9, 2017

Pollution in a car can be worse than outside, as it traps nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and soot-like particles.

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November 8, 2017

For the first time in 113 years, live data is streaming from the top of the UK's tallest mountain.

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November 8, 2017

Long time far from home, with great views... the International Space Station is not your typical holiday spot.

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November 8, 2017

Astronomers discover the celestial equivalent of a horror film villain: a star that wouldn't stay dead.

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November 8, 2017

Energy Environ. Sci., 2017, 10,2334-2341
DOI: 10.1039/C7EE01473B, PaperM. Kolek, F. Otteny, P. Schmidt, C. Muck-Lichtenfeld, C. Einholz, J. Becking, E. Schleicher, M. Winter, P. Bieker, B. Esser
[small pi]-[small pi] interactions in a phenothiazine-based organic redox polymer lead to an ultra-high cycling stability of a lithium-organic battery.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

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November 8, 2017

Energy Environ. Sci., 2017, 10,2342-2351
DOI: 10.1039/C7EE01872J, PaperAylin Kertik, Lik H. Wee, Martin Pfannmoller, Sara Bals, Johan A. Martens, Ivo F. J. Vankelecom
Cross-linked amorphous mixed matrix membranes for selective separations of CO2/CH4 mixed-gas feeds.
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

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November 8, 2017

Re-live the talked-about moment when an eel suffers the consequences of diving into a brine pool for food.

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November 8, 2017
American Society of Agronomy

Soil characteristics like organic matter content and moisture play a vital role in helping plants flourish. It turns out that soil temperature is just as important. Every plant needs a certain soil temperature to thrive. If the temperature changes too quickly, plants won’t do well. Their seeds won’t germinate or their roots will die.

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November 8, 2017
European Commission Joint Research Centre

Limiting global warming below the critical 2C level set out in the Paris Agreement is both feasible and consistent with economic growth – and the knock-on improvements to air quality could already cover the costs of mitigation measures and save more than 300,000 lives annually by 2030.

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November 8, 2017

Hassan was born with skin so delicate it would tear and blister

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November 8, 2017
Purdue University

The system for categorizing hurricanes accounts only for peak wind speeds, but research published in Nature Communications explains why central pressure deficit is a better indicator of economic damage from storms in the United States.

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November 8, 2017

The animals have demonstrated the ability to recognise familiar human faces, according to a study.

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November 7, 2017

From the Apollo spacesuits to the Mars rovers, women behind the scenes have stitched vital spaceflight components.

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November 7, 2017

The first living creature to be sent into orbit around the Earth was a Soviet stray dog called Laika. She was a pioneer of the space race.

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November 7, 2017

University researchers trained sheep to recognise famous people, including Barack Obama and Fiona Bruce.

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November 7, 2017
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

Greenhouse gas emissions caused by urban households’ purchases of goods and services from beyond city limits are much bigger than previously thought. These upstream emissions may occur anywhere in the world and are roughly equal in size to the total emissions originating from a city’s own territory, a new study shows. This is not bad news but in fact offers local policy-makers more leverage to tackle climate change, the authors argue in view of the UN climate summit COP23 that just started. They calculated the first internationally comparable greenhouse gas footprints for four cities from developed and developing countries: Berlin, New York, Mexico City, and Delhi. Contrary to common beliefs, not consumer goods like computers or sneakers that people buy are most relevant, but housing and transport – sectors that cities can substantially govern.

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November 7, 2017

The reported move will leave the US as the only country now outside or opposed to the climate deal.

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November 7, 2017

Energy Environ. Sci., 2017, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C7EE02220D, PerspectiveChun Xian Guo, jingrun ran, Anthony Vasileff, Shizhang Qiao
As one of the most important chemicals and carbon-free energy carriers, ammonia (NH3) has a worldwide annual production of ~150 million tons, and is mainly produced by the traditional high-temperature...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

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November 6, 2017

Teeth of the oldest mammals related to humans have been discovered on the Jurassic coast of Dorset.

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November 6, 2017

Rescued pet apes in Indonesia are being returned to the wild, but traders are still "flouting the law".

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November 6, 2017

A gibbon is the first of its species born in the wild to parents rescued from the illegal pet trade.

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November 6, 2017

Elephants are looking for food in villages in India's forests, with deadly consequences.

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November 6, 2017
Osaka University

The fight against climate change is a call-to-arms for industry. We currently rely on fossil fuels, a major source of the greenhouse gas CO2, not only for energy but also to create chemicals for manufacturing. To ween our economies off this dependency, we must find a new source of “green” raw materials so that factories and laboratories can run without producing and emitting CO2.

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November 6, 2017
King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)

Warm and salty wastewater is a by-product of many industries, including oil and gas production, seafood processing and textile dyeing. KAUST researchers are exploring ways to detoxify such wastewater while simultaneously generating electricity. They are using bacteria with remarkable properties: the ability to transfer electrons outside their cells (exoelectrogenes) and the capacity to withstand extremes of temperature and salinity (extremophiles).

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November 6, 2017

Steve Ludlow has been injecting himself with venom for more than 30 years

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November 6, 2017

The giant build-up of plastic bottles, cutlery and polystyrene plates was captured by underwater photographer Caroline Power.

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November 6, 2017

At a depth of 700 metres, a Blue Planet II submarine was shoved by enormous sharks.

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November 6, 2017

Scientists say that 2017 shows a continuing trend of high temperatures and extreme weather events.

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November 6, 2017

The European Space Agency has part-funded the pilot project involving five ambulances in the Highlands.

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November 5, 2017

More than half of people in the UK can't name a famous woman in science - this week, BBC 100 Women aims to change that number.

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November 5, 2017

More than 80 had been stuck and were moved to other Highland areas with no red squirrels.

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November 5, 2017

US plans to promote coal as a solution to climate change at a key UN meeting rile environmentalists.

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November 4, 2017

A spokesman says climate is "always changing" after a report ties global warming to human activity.

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November 3, 2017
DOE / Sandia National Laboratories

A new optical device at Sandia National Laboratories that helps researchers image pollutants in combusting fuel sprays might lead to clearer skies in the future.

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November 3, 2017

The Norwegian island of Kvaløya is now one of the few places in Europe to see a pod of killer whales.

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November 2, 2017

Scientists have just identified a new great ape species - and it's already in danger.

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November 2, 2017

Highly-specialised staff are needed to take over from European nuclear regulators after Brexit.

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November 2, 2017

The apes in question were only reported to exist after an expedition into Sumatra mountains in 1997.

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November 2, 2017

Energy Environ. Sci., 2017, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C7EE02415K, PaperWolfgang Tress, Mozhgan Yavari, Konrad Domanski, Pankaj Kumar Yadav, Bjoern Niesen, Juan-Pablo Correa-Baena, Anders Hagfeldt, Michael Gratzel
Metal halide perovskite absorber materials are about to emerge as a high-efficiency photovoltaic technology. At the same time, they are suitable for high-throughput manufacturing characterized by a low energy input...
The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry

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November 2, 2017

Scanning technology suggests there is a large, previously unknown cavity in the ancient monument.

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November 1, 2017
DOE / National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

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November 1, 2017

Wildlife officials rushed to help when the elephant was found trapped.

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October 31, 2017

The UK cities with atmospheres considered harmful to health by the WHO are revealed in a new report.

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October 31, 2017

Scientists are now clearer on the freezing climate conditions that forced dinosaurs from the Earth.

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October 31, 2017

The UK's Halley station will be mothballed again this year because of uncertainty over ice cracks.

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October 31, 2017

Herring and haddock could also disappear by the turn of the century due to global warming, warn scientists.

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October 31, 2017

Carbon cuts planned under the Paris accord still fall well short of what's needed, says the UN.

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October 30, 2017

What do the farmers out in the field, in the dairy, and in the milking parlour think about Brexit?

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October 30, 2017
Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

Climate change scientists warn that the continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to cause major disruptions to the global climate system leading to more extreme weather, sea level rise, and biodiversity loss. The changes also will compromise our capacity to generate electricity. In recent decades, capacity losses at United States power plants occurred infrequently, but scientists warn that the warming climate may increase their regularity and magnitude. This instability could interrupt power supply to homes, hospitals, transportation systems, and other critical institutions and infrastructure at a potentially high financial cost.

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